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Salt II was an agreement made between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The agreement was signed in Vienna, Austria on June 18, 1979. The purpose of Salt II was to limit the number of nuclear weapons that each country could possess. The agreement was negotiated by U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Soviet General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev.

The negotiations for Salt II began in November 1972, when the U.S. and the Soviet Union signed the first Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty (Salt I). Salt I limited the number of ballistic missiles that each country could possess. However, Salt I did not limit the number of strategic bombers or submarine-launched missiles.

Salt II was a continuation of Salt I and aimed to reduce the number of nuclear weapons further. The agreement placed a limit on the number of launchers, intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs), and heavy bombers that each country could possess. The agreement also implemented new types of limitations, such as restrictions on mobile intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) and certain types of missile defense systems.

Salt II took three years to negotiate and was signed in June 1979. However, it was never ratified by the U.S. Senate due to concerns over Soviet military action in Afghanistan. In 1981, U.S. President Ronald Reagan announced that the U.S. would no longer abide by the Salt II agreement.

Despite its failure to be ratified, Salt II is still considered an important agreement in the history of arms control. It demonstrated that the U.S. and Soviet Union could work together to limit the number of nuclear weapons and establish a framework for future negotiations.

In conclusion, Salt II was an agreement made between the United States and the Soviet Union to limit the number of nuclear weapons each country could possess. Although it was never ratified, the agreement demonstrated the potential for cooperation between the two superpowers and established important precedents for future arms control negotiations.